kadrey:

Ink wash Xenomorphs

Holy crap, guy. Seriously.

(via wilwheaton)

Boxtrolls

I actually saw Dracula Untold more recently, but it sucked a lot more than blood and it’s really worth talking about. So I want to go back the movie I saw before the, Boxtrolls.

I really wanted to love this movie. It was made with such obvious love and care. There was some great ideas, but those diamonds were pretty rough and trussed way in the boxes. The worst thing about Boxtrolls was that I could see the gems, but just not reach them. I feel like there was the chance for a really amazing story here, but no one pulled it off.

[Here be spoilers!]

image

Let’s talk about the transmisogyny (prejudice against trans women). I’m pretty sure it was an innocent attempt at humor, but the central villain, Archibald Snatcher, spends a fair amount of the movie in a dress and playing the part of Madame Frou Frou, who is a popular performer and well-liked among the White Hats that Snatcher wants so badly to be inducted into.

First off… why? Snatcher doesn’t seem to get any information in his Madame Frou Frou persona. It doesn’t help him further any of his plans at all. In fact, it seems to take time away from his Boxtroll-catching exploits. Frou Frou seems to serve only to show Snatcher lying and deceiving the people of the town. Again, I’m pretty sure it was innocent, but under this thin attempt at humor, Boxtrolls risks perpetuating the idea that trans women are nothing more than men attempting to deceive the cisgendered majority.

And Boxtrolls really didn’t need to be like this! You know, the only time Snatcher seemed truly happy was during the movie was as Madame Frou Frou. One of the (conflicting) messages of Boxtrolls is to accept yourself, that white hats and cheese don’t change the fundamental truth of ourselves. There’s even a scene where Eggs tearfully tells Snatcher not to eat the cheese that he’s allergic to and which will never make him a part of the aristocracy he aspires to.

How great a moment would that have been to have Snatcher realize that Eggs was right, that his true self, the one that was respected and which he loved was Madame Frou Frou? Put down the cheese, Snatcher, and put your awesome dress back on! End the movie with another performance to the applause of the entire town.

(Which would have served the ending better to explain what the hell happened to the White Hats. They were ass-hats, to be sure, but… how exactly did the boss fight at the end or the cheese explosion dissolve the ignorant and self-absorbed council…?)

But no… Snatcher eats the cheese and explodes. Because reasons.

laughterkey:

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.
Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.
Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.
How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?
Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.
The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

He was charged, but never convicted. Per the newyorker:

The next day, he was led into a courtroom, where he learned that he had been charged with robbery, grand larceny, and assault. 

Not trying to imply that in any way makes this better. It’s horrifying from top to bottom.


Read this. Our system is a great idea, but it’s broken. We’ve got to fix it. laughterkey:

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.
Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.
Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.
How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?
Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.
The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

He was charged, but never convicted. Per the newyorker:

The next day, he was led into a courtroom, where he learned that he had been charged with robbery, grand larceny, and assault. 

Not trying to imply that in any way makes this better. It’s horrifying from top to bottom.


Read this. Our system is a great idea, but it’s broken. We’ve got to fix it.

laughterkey:

land-of-propaganda:

3 years in Rikers Island, 2 in solitary confinement, this high school student, NEVER CHARGED, gets released

16-year-old high school sophomore Kalief Browder, of the Bronx, spent nearly three years locked up at the Rikers Jail after he says he was falsely accused of stealing a backpack.  Amazingly, Browder never pleaded guilty, actually refused to plead guilty and requested a trial, even when pressured, but was never convicted and was only offered plea deals while the trial was repeatedly delayed.

Near the end of his time in jail, the judge “offered” to sentence him to time served if a guilty plea was entered, and warned him he could face 15 years in prison if convicted, but Browder still refused to accept the deal.  The only reason Browder was finally released was because his case was dismissed, but the damage had been done.

Browder, a high school student, spent an unbelievable 800 days, or over 2 years, in solitary confinement, which is a common juvenile imprisonment practice that the New York Department of Corrections has now banned after several investigations.

How does a teen end up in jail for 3 years, of which 2 years was spent in solitary confinement, and never be charged with a crime?

Browder’s case highlights several broken mechanisms in the New York legal system that feeds itself to civil liberty abuses on our youth.

  1. The 6th amendment gives us a right to a speedy trial, but in New York they have a “Ready Rule”.  The “Ready Rule” allows the courts to postpone trial dates by offering continuances. The system may give a continuance for 1 week, but logistically it may be 1 month before the trial actually comes to fruition and the still not convicted civilian only gets “credit” for the 1 week, not the actual time they have served.  In Browder’s case, he was given an absolutely ridiculous number of continuances initiated by the prosecution which left him locked up because he could not afford the $3000 bail.
  2. Browder was a high school student and juveniles are supposed to continue their education while behind bars .. except for juveniles that are in solitary confinement.  Guards would place juveniles in solitary and the schooling would stop relinquishing any educational support.
  3. While in solitary, Browder says that guards would routinely refuse to give him his meals.  Hunger is a common complaint by teens that are locked up because of the 12-hour stretch between dinner and breakfast.  Guards would use starve tactics at their discretion for punishment or their own personal enjoyment.  Browder says the worst of his starvations lasted for 4 meals in a row, meaning he was denied breakfast, lunch, dinner and another breakfast.
  4. As it stands, the courts place people in these situations and it is human nature for some to strike a plea deal just to get out of jail.  But Browder did not play into their game and take a plea deal, but maintained his innocence and requested a trial which came at a snail’s pace. This leads one to believe that the courts use this a planned tactic or procedure to play on human nature all in the name of getting convictions.
  5. The issues of using a Public Defender have long been recorded across the country.  In New York, court appointed lawyers make $75 a case.  In order to make money, that PD has to take on huge caseloads which leads to other problems.  Browder, although locked up for nearly three years in Rikers, where his PD was located everyday, never once was visited by his PD or had anyone to advocate his case for him.  This shows a reckless disregard which leads to a vicious cycle of apathy that often leads innocent people to copping pleas or getting longer sentences.

Read more here

He was charged, but never convicted. Per the newyorker:

The next day, he was led into a courtroom, where he learned that he had been charged with robbery, grand larceny, and assault. 

Not trying to imply that in any way makes this better. It’s horrifying from top to bottom.

Read this. Our system is a great idea, but it’s broken. We’ve got to fix it.

(via thatjayjustice)

Today II

Back to vomit soup today and I can’t even seem to find my fucking spoon. How am I supposed to shovel this pathetic word-gruel into my face without it? Or is the word-sou-vomit coming out of me? My metaphor is falling apart on me.

But despite this bullshit in my brain today, Hangman’s Cross has officially passed the 80K-word mark! Congratulations to us. Now we just need to write the other 100K or so words. Your chances of getting this beast in a single book are not looking great.

Today

Can’t tell you how good it feels to be writing again today. If you know the feeling, you know it. If not, I’ll never be able to explain it.

But I guess I’ll try! Some days, being a writer is a wretched bowl of vomit soup, full of hating my own work and frustration with editing or formatting. But other days, like today, it’s glorious rainbows and endless cupcakes of awesomeness.

It’s rainbow and cupcake day, bitches!

m0rethanyoubargainedf0r:

catdad:

If at first you don’t succeed, redefine success.

I reblogged this at like 4am and I’ve spent the whole day thinking about it and randomly laughing

The moral is that even on tough days, bunnies rock.

(via dduane)

Q

suppose-wehaveonlydreamed asked:

Hey Neil, Several years ago I read your "Why Defend the Freedom of Icky Speech," and I've reread it & shared it many times since, but I'm struggling with it now. An Atlantic article today ("The Unsafety Net") talks about rape videos being posted & left up for weeks on Facebook, along with myriad graphic images of violence against women. I believe those should be taken down. Facebook often leaves them up & calls it "controversial humor." Where do you draw the line on censorship?

A

neil-gaiman:

I don’t see taking rape videos down as censorship. (Rape is a crime. A rape video is not art or free speech, at best it’s evidence of a crime.)

I’m happy to defend free speech, including speech I don’t like. I’m also happy to defend the idea of curated areas. There’s a huge difference between prosecuting an artist and removing the work from public view, and deciding what you do and don’t want to see hanging on the walls of a space you own. Facebook gets to decide what they allow up, and they have their own standards and rules: making them enforce their own standards and rules is a good thing, not censorship.

(Having said that, I’m often astonished that people find something they find troubling, normally something that’s only been seen by a tiny handful of people if that, and ask me to go on Twitter about it, and send 2 million people to see it and be upset by it too, and then the people who sent me the link get upset because I’d rather let something die in obscurity than get millions of people upset at something they would never otherwise have learned about. )

Oops. I haven’t been updating again. I will, I promise.

No, really…

*naps*

kqedscience:

We’ve never called a photo of a spider “adorable” before, so this is a first!

This photo of a jumping spider carrying her baby was taken by Jong Atmosfera.

Awesome.

(via exploratorium)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about. nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about.

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Worth thinking about.

(via wilwheaton)